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When people think about healing (whether in therapy, are in therapy, or are considering therapy), they often have many misconceptions about what it means to heal and be healed. These misconceptions can often deter people from initiating therapy and getting the help they need. They can also make people feel insecure about the progress that they have made and are making. There are many myths about healing. Here are some myths about healing.

Myth 1

Therapy is for broken or damaged people. Or therapy is only for people who have severe mental health issues. 

Truth: There is no such thing as being broken or damaged because people are not fundamentally flawed. Therapy is for anyone who wants support managing stressors, problems, traumas, anxiety, depression, and other mental health issues. Anyone can benefit from therapy.

Myth 2

Therapy is only for couples who are close to breaking up. Or, going to couples therapy means you’re failing in your relationship.

Truth: All relationships experience problems, and most problems are unsolvable. Couples therapy can teach people how to manage unsolvable problems. Couples therapy shows love and dedication from each partner for the relationship. In fact, many people seek couples therapy as a prevention method for breakups and divorce.

Myth 3

Your therapist knows what’s best for you all the time. 

Truth: Therapists are experts in their field, but they are not experts in you. No one knows you more than you know you. In fact, therapists will get “it” wrong from time to time. That’s completely normal. It’s important for you to take the feedback that resonates and tell your therapist when something does not resonate. Remember, therapists are people, too.

Myth 4

Being “healed” means not experiencing any more bad days or setbacks. 

Truth: Healing is not linear. Relapses and setbacks do not define your progress or healing. In fact, setbacks and relapses are a part of the healing cycle. Healing does not mean never experiencing bad days, but it means recognizing that bad days and setbacks are a part of life. The goal is to take these moments as growth opportunities.

Myth 5

Being “healed” is a destination. 

Truth: Healing is not a destination; it’s a journey. As we experience life (the good and the bad), we experience new ways to grow and heal. When we begin to view healing as a journey, we lose the pressure we put on ourselves to “get it right.” Remember, healing means someone working towards healing, not a healed person.

Myth 6

Healing means you always feel good about yourself. 

Truth: People who are healing often do feel good about themselves. But at the same time, there are days when they don’t feel good. They may feel self-conscious, have depressive episodes, feel angry, or isolate themselves. The important thing to remember is that it’s normal to experience fluctuations in mood and behavior. What matters is how gentle and compassionate we are to ourselves.

Takeaways

There are many misconceptions about what it means to heal and be healed. It’s important to remember a few things: No one is broken, damaged, or fundamentally flawed. Healing isn’t linear. Setbacks, bad days, and relapses are a part of the process. Healing does not mean being healed but rather working on healing. Healing is a journey, not a destination. Remain compassionate with yourself.



While our physical offices are located in South Loop and Lakeview neighborhoods in Chicago, Illinois for in-person sessions, we also welcome and serve clients for online therapy from anywhere in Illinois and Washington, D.C. Clients from the Chicagoland area may choose in-office or online therapy and usually commute from surrounding areas such as River North, West Loop, Gold Coast, Old Town, Lincoln Park, Lake View, Rogers Park, Logan Square, Pilsen, Bridgeport, Little Village, Bronzeville, South Shore, Hyde Park, Back of the Yards, Wicker Park, Bucktown and many more.  

This page is also part of the Roamers Therapy Glossary; a collection of mental-health related definitions that are written by our therapists.


While our offices are currently located at the South Loop neighborhood of Downtown Chicago, Illinois, we also welcome and serve clients for online therapy from anywhere in Illinois and Washington, D.C. Clients from the Chicagoland area may choose in-office or online therapy and usually commute from surrounding areas such as River North, West Loop, Gold Coast, Old Town, Lincoln Park, Lake View, Rogers Park, Logan Square, Pilsen, Bridgeport, Little Village, Bronzeville, South Shore, Hyde Park, Back of the Yards, Wicker Park, Bucktown and many more. You can visit our contact page to access detailed information on our office location.